The Spark

“The emancipation of the working class will only be achieved by the working class itself.” — Karl Marx

The Wars behind the Nobel Peace Prize

Oct 12, 2009

The Nobel Peace Prize was funded by Alfred Nobel from the family fortune made on explosives used in wars. War was not only profitable for the Nobel business; war was also the basis for the prizes given to famous people involved in “peace” after innumerable wars.

In 1906, then-president Teddy Roosevelt won the Nobel Peace Prize. Roosevelt had made his reputation during the so-called “Spanish-American War” in 1899, when he led troops into Cuba.

The next U.S. president winning a “Nobel for peace” was Woodrow Wilson. He was re-elected in 1916 with his promise to keep the U.S. out of World War I, already wreaking horrendous devastation in Europe. Three months after his inauguration, he led the U.S. into war, expanding it greatly.

In 1973, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger (for both the Nixon and Ford administrations) won a Nobel Peace prize, supposedly for negotiating a cease-fire in the U.S.-Viet Nam war. In fact, Kissinger had been one of those behind the hideous policies that helped destroy Viet Nam.

Why don’t they just call it the Nobel War Prize?