The Spark

“The emancipation of the working class will only be achieved by the working class itself.” — Karl Marx

Movie Review:
The Bay

Jan 7, 2013

Do you love getting near the water, maybe to swim, fish, picnic, or go out on a boat? Then you will get hit hard by “The Bay,” a horror film by Barry Levinson, Oscar-winning director of “Rain Man,” “Diner,” and more recently “Wag the Dog” and “You Don’t Know Jack.”

“The Bay” takes place in an imaginary, fun-loving beach town in Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay that lives for its boardwalk. But the mayor gave approval for a huge water treatment center serving the massive chicken farming operations nearby. As steroid-loaded chicken manure is dumped into the Bay, the mayor lies and insists the treated water is safe to drink. The federal government also covers up the awful threat.

But one July Fourth, all the tourist partiers in town suffer horrible symptoms. They rush to the hospital ... where the workers are dying, too!

Barry Levinson’s movie bloodbath is make-believe, but Baltimore residents remember the very real algae bloom and fish kill in the Inner Harbor last spring, and the dozens of fish kills in the Bay over the last 30 years coming from such pollution.

Be entertained by this 2012 movie, now available from Netflix, Amazon, iTunes, etc. But know that there is a serious reality underlying it.