The Spark

“The emancipation of the working class will only be achieved by the working class itself.” — Karl Marx

September 11th, 2007:
Terrorism of the biggest power

Sep 10, 2007

Within days of the September 11, 2001, attack, Bush proclaimed a “war on terrorism” – a new kind of war, as he called it. For the last six years, the fearful atmosphere originally produced by the attack on the World Trade Center has been carefully reinforced, with declarations of “red alerts,” “orange alerts” and “yellow alerts”; announcements that al-Qaida “sleeper cells” were broken up; and requests that the population be “vigilant,” that any “suspicious behavior” immediately be reported to the FBI.

Whatever al-Qaida is – if it actually existed before September 11th – and whatever despicable things it might have done or be planning to do in the future, this U.S. “war on terrorism” is not aimed at rooting it out.

Bush’s “war on terrorism” has always been a propaganda campaign used to justify a wide-ranging attack on the population in this country, especially the working class, and to justify U.S. wars against other people, especially for oil.

Long before September 11, 2001, the U.S. had been carrying out a war against Iraq, starting with the bombing and invasion of that country in 1991. While U.S. troops were withdrawn in 1991 from inside Iraq, the bombing continued. September 11 was used to justify going back into Iraq, setting in motion a war that created still more horrific conditions for the people of Iraq.

Terrorism carried out by the biggest military power in the world can only spawn more terrorism. U.S. military actions against other people have created such a deep reservoir of anger that someone like Osama bin Laden has had no trouble finding recruits. People around the world are paying the price.